American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA)

 

 

Founded in 1931 and located in Park Ridge, Ill., and Washington, D.C., the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) is the professional organization representing more than 50,000 Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) and student registered nurse anesthetists across the United States. As advanced practice registered nurses and anesthesia specialists, CRNAs administer approximately 43 million anesthetics to patients in the United States each year and are the primary providers of anesthesia care in rural America. In some states, CRNAs are the sole anesthesia professionals in nearly 100 percent of rural hospitals. For more information, visit www.aana.com and www.future-of-anesthesia-care-today.com and follow @aanawebupdates on Twitter.

The American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) is the professional association for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) and student registered nurse anesthetists (SRNAs). AANA membership includes more than 50,000 CRNAs and SRNAs, representing over 90 percent of the nurse anesthetists in the United States.  CRNAs are advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) who personally administer approximately 43 million anesthetics to patients each year in the United States.  Nurse anesthetists have provided anesthesia in the United States for 150 years, and high-quality, cost-effective CRNA services are in high demand.  CRNAs are Medicare Part B providers and since 1989 have billed Medicare directly for 100 percent of the physician fee schedule amount for services. 

CRNAs are involved in every aspect of anesthesia services including a pre-anesthesia patient assessment, obtaining informed consent for anesthesia administration, developing a plan for anesthesia administration, administering the anesthetic, monitoring and interpreting the patient's vital signs, and managing the patient throughout the surgery.  CRNAs also provide acute, chronic, and interventional pain management services.  CRNAs provide anesthesia for a wide variety of surgical cases and in some states are the sole anesthesia providers in nearly 100 percent of rural hospitals, affording these medical facilities obstetrical, surgical, trauma stabilization, and pain management capabilities.  Nurse anesthesia predominates in Veterans Hospitals and in the U.S. Armed Services.  CRNAs work in every setting in which anesthesia is delivered including hospital surgical suites and obstetrical delivery rooms, ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs), pain management facilities, and the offices of dentists, podiatrists, and all types of specialty surgeons.